Planning: Storms over the south-east

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Chain reaction

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Land Securities to enter Belfast shopping battle

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Industrial: Into the fast lane

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Desmond moves Express to Square Mile

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LandSecs appoints Lend Lease retail man

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PREMIUMStudy reveals terrible toll of domestic violence on women workers

first_imgFacebook Log in with your social account LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Forgot Password ? #women Women violence-against-women #violence female-workers domestic-abuse domestic-violence #workers Sari, a 32-year-old garment factory worker, relies on over-the-counter painkillers just to get through the day. Her problem is not in the workplace, it’s at home, with her abusive husband.Sari, who lives in Jakarta, said her work was affected whenever she had a scuffle with him.“I cry and cannot sleep after a rough fight. I get awful headaches and arrive at work tired,” she said. “I need to take a higher dose of medicine just to be able to finish my work.”Sari’s story appears in a report published by women’s rights group Perempuan Mahardika, which conducted a study on 26 women workers who faced abuse at home. Other women in the study have been driven to even greater extremes than reliance on medication, including attempted suicide.All have experienced domestic abuse — physical, psychological and emotional —&n… Topics : Google Linkedinlast_img read more

20,000 trucks serving Tanjung Priok port can’t operate amid floods: Association

first_imgFlooding on thoroughfares of the capital and major roads in satellite cities has disrupted operations of at least 20,000 trucks in Greater Jakarta.The deputy chairman of the Indonesian Trucks Business Association (Aprtindo), Kyatmaja Lookman, said the association’s members operated 20,000 trucks a day to and from Tanjung Priok Port in North Jakarta, and on Tuesday the trucks could not hit the road because of widespread flooding.“Usually, floods do not reach the Cakung-Cilincing and Marunda toll road,” he said, referring to one of the primary arteries connecting the city with the country’s biggest ports. “I haven’t got detailed reports from the members, but typically, there are about 20,000 trucks belonging to our members moving to and from Tanjung Priok each day,” he told The Jakarta Post. “If we include trucks operating across Jakarta, the number could be higher,” he said.He estimated that the loss borne by the members could reach Rp 30 billion a day (US$2.15 million). That calculation, he said, did not include losses from possible damage to the goods.Kyatmaja said he had received reports that some truck depots were inundated. Should flooding damage truck engines, the loss could be Rp 20 million to Rp 30 million per unit, he went on.Topics :last_img read more

In indigenous Colombia, Venezuelan migration sparks conflict

first_imgWayuu people – who generally speak both their own Wayuunaiki tongue and Spanish – have citizenship rights in both countries.Some migrated to Venezuela over the past two decades to take advantage of free education and other benefits. But hyperinflation and a six-year recession under President Nicolas Maduro have driven thousands back, part of a wave of some 1.7 million people who have fled Venezuela for Colombia in recent years.For already-struggling communities – which often scrape by on subsistence ranching and gasoline smuggling – the needs of returning Wayuu are hard to meet. Malnourishment has long plagued Wayuu children and many communities can ill afford more mouths to feed.A Colombian girl from the indigenous Wayuu tribe herds goats in the desert, in Castilletes, Colombia February 20, 2020. (REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez)With dozens of disputes now raging, Wayuu leaders say they hope mediation will head off escalations in violence, as brawls break out between neighbors and within families.Yohedys Palmar, a Wayuu police inspector in Castilletes – which overlooks an aquamarine bay in the eastern reaches of Upper Guajira – said there are about 10 active disputes in his area alone, the majority involving returning Wayuu.”There has been violence,” said Palmar. “Up to now it hasn’t come to deaths, but that could happen if conflicts are not resolved.”Palmar said he had heard of killings related to returnee disputes in the inland settlement of Jarara. Reuters was not able to independently confirm this.Scant mobile phone service makes communication difficult in the impoverished and isolated region, where the Colombian state is virtually non-existent.The hyper-localized system of pütchipü’üs also makes data collection on the conflicts difficult, said Alberto Henriquez, the secretary of indigenous affairs for the Uribia municipality, which includes Upper Guajira.Palmar’s father, Rafael Sapuana, is the pütchipü’ü in charge of the Ipuana dispute involving the Venezuelan returnees.”They come with so many needs, with hunger, without work,” said Sapuana, a father of 50 children, from a nearby grouping of houses where he lives with some of his family. “We want to avoid blood-letting … War doesn’t bring anything good.””We hope the government, President Duque, will give us a hand with the crisis.”Men from the indigenous Wayuu tribe tank a car with smuggled gasoline, in Castilletes, Colombia February 18, 2020. (REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez)MENDING FENCESMaria Elena Ipuana is the matriarch of the Ipuana Montiers. She has returned to settle on this patch of family property with her husband Angel Jose Montier and more than 40 of her children and grandchildren, after years of sporadic travel back and forth to Maracaibo, a center of the oil industry in Venezuela.”Food used to be really cheap in Venezuela, now it’s so expensive,” Ipuana said. “We have to survive however we can.”The family is squeezed into five small makeshift houses. Two of the grandchildren, ages 1 and 4, have frail limbs indicative of malnutrition.And the family is about to grow – Ipuana’s sister, brother-in-law and 22 of their children and grandchildren will arrive soon from Venezuela, she said.A Venezuelan family from the indigenous Wayuu tribe tries to start a motorcycle, in Castilletes, Colombia February 19, 2020. (REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez)A resolution to the goat disagreement would take at least one problem off the family’s long list, Ipuana said.”We need this problem to be mediated, to be resolved, to avoid conflict with the other family,” she said.The following day both families descended on the Sapuanas’ homestead to shake on a deal: any further dispute between them would result in the aggressor owing the other family 50 goats or sheep. They sealed the agreement with shots of burning chirrinche liquor.A reconciliation is a best-case scenario, but there is no shortage of disputes.Uribia, where the population of 205,000 is 95% Wayuu, has had at least 38 cases of land conflicts to date involving people returning from Venezuela, said Henriquez.Because the local government has limited power in Wayuu territory, that may not be an accurate representation of the frequency of disputes, he added.”There are lots of cases where the family uses a pütchipü’ü and it’s solved based on custom.”  Topics : In the sun-baked scrubland of northern Colombia’s remote La Guajira province, a bitter quarrel rages between two neighboring Wayuu indigenous families, one of them seeking refuge from a humanitarian crisis across the border in Venezuela.Their feud was sparked by goats. Without fences to stop them, their herds mingle amid the low bushes between the two homesteads, whipped by a hot and dusty desert wind here in ancestral Wayuu territory.One family, the Ipuana Montiers – who recently arrived from Venezuela, fleeing shortages of food and medicine – say they have lost 50 goats to the herd belonging to their more established neighbors, the Ipuana, who count local leaders among their ranks.center_img Such conflicts over land, water, and animals are increasingly common as Venezuela spirals into disaster and thousands of indigenous Wayuu who once left their Colombian homes for Venezuela return. The influx is testing the limits of tribal unity, according to Wayuu police and tribal mediators, known as pütchipü’üs.A pair of goats from a flock belonging to a Venezuelan indigenous family from the Wayuu tribe, fight in the middle of the desert, in Castilletes, Colombia February 20, 2020. (REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez)In a dark greenhouse with plastic siding at the end of a long, rutted dirt track, Rangel Ipuana – a pütchipü’ü who is the patriarch of the Ipuana clan – says he wants to avoid conflict, but many of the returnees from Venezuela have forgotten the Wayuu way of life.”Families are returning to where their grandparents lived and there’s been so much conflict and theft because they don’t know how to manage the land,” said the 72-year-old.last_img read more

Austria could start loosening lockdown from April 14

first_imgTopics : Austria could start easing its coronavirus lockdown measures from next week, Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said Monday, but warned that this depended on citizens abiding by social distancing rules.”The aim is that from April 14… smaller shops up to a size of 400 square meters, as well as hardware and garden stores can open again, under strict security conditions of course,” Kurz said at a press conference.He added that if the government’s timetable goes to plan, larger shops will reopen on 1 May and from mid-May hotels, restaurants and other services could also start to open their doors again in stages. However, he stressed that the restrictions on movement that Austria has introduced to fight the spread of COVID-19 remained in place and called on Austrians not to celebrate Easter with people outside their household.Schools will remain closed until mid-May and public events will remain banned until the end of June, Kurz said.If trends in infection began to worsen again, the government “always has the possibility to hit the emergency brake” and re-introduce restrictions, he said.The country of 8.8 million people currently has 12,058 confirmed infections, with 204 deaths and 2,998 people who have recovered.last_img read more