Bassnectar Goes Downtempo For New ‘Unlimited’ Album [Review/Stream]

first_imgBass god Lorin Ashton, aka Bassnectar, has done it again with his twelfth studio release Unlimited. Just as his label Amorphous Music suggests, this album is truly unclassifiable, yet it is undeniable that this collection of hypnotic songs is more downtempo than most of his previous releases. But fear not— there is still plenty of heart-thumping bass to cozza frenzy.On Youtube, Bassnectar described the first track “Reaching Out” as a song “about human connection, but also about our personal journeys and how they intersect in cathartic and beautiful ways in a kind of metamorphosis.” The accompanying video stunningly captures this essence and can be watched here.“Music Is The Drug” featuring LUZCID really needs no explanation and leaves one wondering ‘where can I get an IV drip of that?’ “TKO” is a referee-declared hit, with Rye Rye and Zion I delivering the final blows. Tapping in heavy-hitters G Jones and Lafa Taylor, an extra filthy layer of bass is dished up in “Mind Tricks.” It’s easy to get lost in the spiral of this song’s hook: “the mind tricks the body tricks the mind tricks the body.”“Unlimited Combinations” is like a carnival ride for adults. Strap yourselves in, bassheads, we’re going for a ride! “Level Up” with LEViT∆TE features highly electronified elements of traditional Bollywood dance combined with nicely complementing verses by Seattle-based rapper Macntaj. “Shampion Chip” carries a heavy feet-stomping beat for two and a half minutes before bottoming out to wobbly drop full of clickety gloriousness. Right at the halfway mark of the album, “Zogdilla” delivers the heavy basslines just as we need them. Creatures of this same name will no doubt get raucous to this knee-banging track all summer long.A paracosm, as defined by Wikipedia, is a detailed imaginary world created in one’s mind, that may contain humans, animals, and things that exist in reality…or not. With that bit of knowledge drop, it’s interesting to contemplate the intentions and delivery of Bassnectar’s next track “Paracosm,” for which he again partnered with glitch pioneers, The Glitch Mob. You can continue to sail away into the depths of your own mind with “Surrender,” and then wind down an increasingly darker path with “Dream Catcher.”Critical to this other-worldly voyage, both on the album and for live shows, are tracks like “Journey To The Center” and “In The Beginning,” which challenge you to push through the glob of glue that is your head. When you make it through, you’re rewarded with the utterly beautiful “Rising Rising,” which is Bassnectar’s breathtaking remix of Crywolf’s original song. This whimsical lullaby leads into the final track “Inspire the Empathetic” which features a couple of guys laughing – Lorin included – and singing a capella. In 2004, he released a track of this same name, which spotlighted the corruptness of media corporations. Twelve years later, fans across the interwebs are now trying to determine the meaning of this newest release, which is much more light-hearted and political-message-absent, compared to its counterpart. We can think on that, as I’m sure the mastermind Lorin intended us to do.Last week, the hills of Bethel Woods, NY were alive with the sound of bass music, as Lorin unleashed this fury for the first time at Mysteryland USA. While some were caught off guard with the more chilled-out nature of the set, the majority of his legion understood the transformational journey he was directing. Bassnectar’s next stop is Electric Forest, followed by a string of other summer festivals, including Moonrise, Electric Zoo, and Life Is Beautiful. Check out the full tour schedule here.You can stream the new release below.last_img read more

Fans reflect on ‘somber’ game day

first_imgDuring the moment of silence in honor of Declan Sullivan before Saturday’s football game, sophomore Erin Wright said the only sound she heard in the Stadium was the American flag clinking against the flagpole. “That’s what I thought was most striking,” Wright said. “I noticed a few people after it was over saying ‘oh my gosh, did you look at the flag? Did you hear the flag?’” Sullivan, a Notre Dame junior and videographer for the University’s football team, died Wednesday after a film tower fell during football practice. Freshman Cat Caracci compared Saturday’s moment of silence to the moment of silence before the Sept. 11 football game against Michigan. On Sept. 11, she said she remembered hearing people talking during the moment of silence, but not on Saturday during the moment in honor of Sullivan. Wright said the overall mood on campus was different on Saturday as opposed to other home football games. “I think the mood was much more somber all around campus,” she said. Management Professor Suzanne Coshow wore a button she made from the same decal football players wore on their helmets to Saturday’s game in honor of Sullivan. She said Sullivan was in one of her classes this semester, and making stickers and buttons to wear and give to other fans was a way to honor his memory. “I’m hoping that we honor him today, that we remember him,” Coshow said before the game. Coshow also said she observed the somber mood on campus before the game, but did not hear people talking about Wednesday’s accident. While she usually attends all home football games and holds a tailgate, she did not tailgate on Saturday. “When the parking pass came up on the [e-mail] listserv yesterday, I didn’t grab it because it didn’t seem like the usual celebration,” she said. Tony Heitzman, who traveled from Louisville, Ky. to see his first Notre Dame football game, said he heard people talking about Wednesday’s accident on campus Saturday. “They’re just pretty somber in their thoughts about it,” Heitzman said. Rich Huxtable, a 1980 Tulsa graduate who lives in Kansas City, Mo., was on Notre Dame’s campus for the game Saturday. He said he heard about Sullivan’s death, but it did not change his travel plans. Since it was his first time at Notre Dame, he said he did not notice any particular mood on campus before the game. “This is the first football game at Notre Dame I’ve been to, so I can’t compare it,” he said. “Obviously there are some neat things that happen here before the game, but if there’s a change in mood I wouldn’t notice it and I don’t see any difference.” Junior Alyssa Sappenfield worked as a cashier at The Huddle in LaFortune Student Center Saturday afternoon before the game. She said she noticed many people wearing the decal with Sullivan’s initials. “It was a lot quieter in [The Huddle],” Sappenfield said. “It was kind of muted.” Senior Emily Salvaterra said she did not hear people talking about the accident at Saturday’s game, but she could tell students were thinking about it. “When they played the Alma Mater at halftime I thought that was really powerful,” Salvaterra said. “You could tell people were taking it really seriously.” Sam Werner contributed to this report.last_img read more