Covid Threatens People With Intellectual and Developmental Challenges

first_imgChronic kidney disease, Alzheimer’s disease, colorectal cancer, mobility impairment, epilepsy, heart failure, spinal cord injury and liver disease were also associated with an increased risk of death.The report is not the first to highlight the unique risks that individuals with developmental disorders and intellectual disabilities face in the pandemic. Scientists at Syracuse University reported in June that people with these disabilities who were living in group homes in New York State had far higher rates of Covid-19, compared with other state residents, and that their risk of dying was markedly higher, as well.The population is uniquely vulnerable for several reasons. Many live in group homes or receive care from aides, therapists or teachers who must maintain close physical proximity in order to assist them. Between 16 percent and 20 percent live in congregate settings, compared with only 6 percent of seniors, said Scott Landes, an associate professor of sociology at Syracuse University and an author of that study.- Advertisement – Many are medically frail to begin with, with high rates of underlying health conditions, particularly respiratory problems. That makes them susceptible to pneumonia, increasing the risk for severe illness if they become infected with Covid.Individuals with Down syndrome are more likely to have congenital heart defects; they may have less muscle tone around the neck and a larger tongue, increasing the risk of choking frequently and developing lung infections. Over all, the death rate among all patients with Covid-19 was 0.6 percent. By contrast, 1.22 percent of those with developmental disorders and Covid-19 died, as did 3.37 percent of those with intellectual disabilities.In addition to the high risk to people with developmental disorders, lung cancer and intellectual disabilities, people with spina bifida and other nervous system anomalies were twice as likely to die of Covid-19. So were patients with leukemia and lymphoma.- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

World Bank Mission Team Arrives In Dominica

first_imgLocalNews World Bank Mission Team Arrives In Dominica by: – January 25, 2012 Share Photo credit: topnewsinA World Bank Mission team led by Carmen Carpio, Health Specialist, arrived in Dominica on January 23, 2012 to provide technical assistance in support of the Dominica health sector. The mission will consist of two main activities which include discussing and exploring opportunities for results-based financing (RBF) approaches in Dominica’s health sector and assessing the Health Information System. Results-Based Financing (RBF) for Health is a tool used for increasing the quantity and quality of health services. It combines the use of incentives for health-related behaviours with a strong focus on results, and can support efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).In line with discussing and exploring RBF approaches for Dominica’s health sector, the World Bank in partnership with the Ministry of Health will host a RBF workshop at the Fort Young Hotel on January 26-27, 2012. Participants representing a cross section of health officials and different Ministries will be in attendance. The objective of the workshop is to raise awareness on what “Results Based Financing” is and how these approaches are being implemented in different countries globally. The workshop will include presentations on the Argentina Plan Nacer experience, Belize Pay for Performance program, and Burundi’s Performance Based Financing approach. Participants will also engage in group work and case study discussions to raise challenges and opportunities for RBF approaches in Dominica’s health sector.In support of the RBF workshop and to provide the World Bank team with a better understanding of the challenges faced at the different health service delivery levels in Dominica, the Ministry of Health organized site visits for the World Bank team to visit the Princess Margaret Hospital and Type I and Type III Health Centres throughout Dominica. The workshop is the first activity of the RBF program and will be followed by a situational analysis to further explore how to effectively apply RBF approaches in the health sector. It will also include study tours visits to countries implementing good practice RBF approaches relevant to Dominica’s context, and the development of a country work plan to support further exploring an RBF approach for the health sector. A follow-on visit by the World Bank team will take place in February to focus on the health information system (HIS). This visit will build on the RBF workshop and assess the stage of development of the HIS and identify opportunities for supporting potential RBF approaches and regional reporting on common health indicators across the OECS. Dominica Vibes News Tweet Sharecenter_img Share Sharing is caring! 17 Views   no discussionslast_img read more