Gov’t Urged to Prioritize WASH

first_imgWaterAid Liberia, in partnership with WASH Stakeholders and Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), has called on the government to strengthen the health care system through the provision of adequate water, sanitation and hygiene.The group made the call on Monday, August 8, in a joint communiqué addressed to the Ministry of Health. They want the government to give post-Ebola recovery for water, sanitation and hygiene the highest priority.Presenting the letter to Deputy Health Minister, Dr. Francis Kateh, the chairman of the Liberia WASH CSOs Network, Prince Kreplah, said the action by the group is intended to urge government to improve the health sector.Kreplah, however, commend the government for strides made to improve WASH in health care facilities across the country, adding that the government should exert more effort to deliver on its health and WASH promises.In response, Deputy Health Minister Kateh thanked WaterAid and WASH’s CSO partners for their continued work, and agreed that the issue of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) are crucial to the health care delivery system of the country.Dr. Kateh, who is also the nation’s Chief Medical Officer, appealed to Liberians to take their health seriously, especially when it involves water.Following the presentation of the letter to the Health Ministry, a press conference was held to address key health and WASH issues.The Chairman of the Liberia NGOs Network, George Kayah, commended the government and development partners for steps taken to improve WASH and health care delivery but noted that despite these efforts there still remain serious deficiencies in water, sanitation and hygiene in rural communities, hospitals and clinics.WASH Coordinator at the Health Ministry, Wataku Kortima, disclosed that the government has put in place WASH protocols to ensure that water, sanitation and hygiene play a key role in the country’s health care delivery system.He urged collaborative efforts among CSO actors as well as Liberians to ensure that challenges affecting the health sector are resolved. The Health Ministry has started the training of health care workers on WASH protocols and the essence of WASH in health, he added.Speaking on behalf of the British Charity WaterAid in Liberia, Program Effectiveness Coordinator Samuel Quirmolue indicated that WaterAid will continue to support the government and local partners in the sector to improve WASH and make it accessible.Meanwhile, a baseline report released on water, sanitation and hygiene in health facilities in 2015 found out that about 95 percent of health care facilities do not meet the Ministry of Health’s standards on water quantity for all purposes.More than 50 percent of health facilities do not have a protected year–round source of water, and 20 percent do not have any protected source on site.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

US sprinter Coleman cleared as USADA withdraws case

first_img0Shares0000Charges against sprinter Christian Coleman have been dropped © AFP/File / JOHN THYSLOS ANGELES, United States, Sep 3 – Christian Coleman has been cleared to take part in this month’s World Athletics Championships after the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) dropped charges against him on a technicality, a statement said Monday.US sprinter Coleman, the fastest man over 100m this year, had been facing a two-year suspension after drug-testers were unable to locate him on three separate occasions in a 12-month period. However, USADA said in a statement that after receiving guidance from the World Anti-Doping Agency on how the 12-month window should be calculated, it was withdrawing its case.“Consistent application of the global anti-doping rules is essential in every case,” USADA chief executive Travis Tygart said in a statement.“In this case we applied the rules to Mr Coleman in the manner that USADA understands should be applied to any other international-level athlete.“We must approach every case with the primary goal of delivering fairness to athletes under the rules and providing transparency and consistency in order to build their trust and support for the anti-doping system.”USADA said in its statement it had first recorded a “whereabouts failure” against Coleman on June 6 last year.A doping control officer had attempted to test the sprinter and discovered that he had failed to update his whereabouts information to accurately reflect his location.Two more whereabouts failures were also logged on January 16 this year and April 26.However Coleman argued that under International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI) guidelines, his first missed case should have been backdated to the first day of that quarter — April 1, 2018 — which would mean the dates of the three offences fell outside the required 12-month time frame for a doping offence to have occurred.In order to avoid future confusion, the rule is being revised with the change expected to take place in 2021.USADA said it had consulted with WADA to receive an official interpretation of the ISTI rules last week.“This interpretation was received on Friday, August 30, 2019, and was that the Filing Failure which USADA had recorded in June 2018, should relate back to April 1, 2018, the first day of the quarter in which the failure to update occurred,” USADA said in a statement.– ‘Presumption of innocence’ –“Given these facts, USADA has determined that under the applicable rules, and in order to ensure that Coleman is treated consistently with other athletes under the World Anti-Doping Program, Coleman should not be considered to have three Whereabouts Failures in a 12-month period.”USADA said Coleman had since provided his whereabouts information by the start of each quarter as required and had been tested by the agency on 20 separate occasions.The sprinter had been due to face a hearing on Thursday which has now been scrapped, USADA said.The agency said Coleman was free to compete with immediate effect but noted that the decision to withdraw the case could still be appealed by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).“Every athlete is entitled to a presumption of innocence until their case is concluded through the established legal process,” Tygart said.“This is certainly the case for Mr Coleman, who has been found by USADA not to have committed a Whereabouts Violation and is fully eligible to compete under the rules,” he added.Coleman is the fastest man in the world over the 100m and the favourite in that distance heading into the 2019 World Championships in Doha, Qatar. He is also expected to run in the 4x100m Relay and the 200m.He has run the two fastest 100m of 2019, a 9.85 and a 9.81.In an interview with NBC’s Ato Boldon last month, Coleman said he was confident the hearing would exonerate him.0Shares0000(Visited 15 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more