Masters: Nick Dougherty hoping for a McIlroy Slam, but American challenge is strong | Golf News

first_img Rory McIlroy is confident his game is in the right place heading into The Masters as he reiterated that limiting mistakes will be especially vital. One player who has never had a distance problem is Rory McIlroy, and as much as I’d love to see him complete the Grand Slam of major titles, I’m not sure it will be this year.Rory is more “under the radar” this week with so much attention directed at Bryson, and he’s said he’s happy to not be the main focus ahead of the one major that eludes his collection.After he won the third leg of the Grand Slam at The Open in 2014, he finished in the top 10 in each of the next four Masters tournaments, although he lost his way a little last year and managed only a tie for 21st. But he’s generally been fantastic, and clearly one of the premier players at Augusta over the last 10 years. There are so many home players to get past even before you add tournament-favourite Bryson DeChambeau into the mix, so it’s going to be really tough for the British contingent to emulate Lyle, Faldo, Woosnam and Willett.There’s no doubt they’re capable, they’ve all got big golf games and Augusta always offers the opportunity to step out from the crowd and put in an inspired performance. But it needs something extra special to get across the line here.One thing in favour of the less-experienced players this week could be the absence of patrons. Any major championship is ramped up by an atmosphere that can be so big, powerful and often overwhelming for the uninitiated – and no more so than at Augusta National. “As strong as the British and Irish challenge is, the Americans are looking pretty formidable right now. DJ, Cantlay and Schauffele all look good, and there are so many home players to get past even before you add Bryson DeChambeau into the mix” Last Updated: 12/11/20 6:19am As strong as the British and Irish challenge is, the Americans are looking pretty formidable right now. Dustin Johnson looked in great form last week in Houston, Patrick Cantlay beat a very strong field at the Zozo Championship, and Xander Schauffele has not finished outside the top-25 in his last 11 starts and went so close to Masters glory last year. Can the British and Irish challengers upstage a powerful home contingent at the Masters this week? Nick Dougherty explains the magnitude of that challenge …Only four British golfers have made the trip to the Butler Cabin to be presented with a Green Jacket, so what are the chances of making that a “famous five” this week?Tyrrell Hatton certainly has great form coming into the Masters, but his record at Augusta National isn’t the best. In three appearances, he’s yet to crack the top 40, but he’s in great shape to improve on that this week. Get Sky Sports Golf for just £10 a month All four days of The Masters exclusively live. Get our £10 golf offer. Find out more here. World No 1 Dustin Johnson could deny Rory McIlroy this week – Advertisement – He’s been tipped by many to lead the British challenge, but I’d lean towards the more experienced players in the field. Lee Westwood has had a great year and still hasn’t given up hope of winning that elusive major, and I’m expecting a good week for Justin Rose.He hasn’t had the best of years and has slipped to 28th in the world rankings, but he’s got a cracking record at Augusta. Runner-up twice, including that play-off defeat to Sergio Garcia in 2017, three other top-10 finishes and he’ll be determined to atone for his first missed cut in the tournament last year.- Advertisement – Experience is likely to be a big factor at Augusta Experience is likely to be a big factor at Augusta

Researchers examine risk factors for opioid dependence in patients undergoing surgery for

first_imgJun 19 2018Researchers investigated risk factors for the development of opioid dependence in patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). They found that, overall, patients were more likely to have a dependency on opioid medications before surgery than afterward. This finding and more appear in a new article published today in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine: “Factors predicting opioid dependence in patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spondylolisthesis: analysis from the MarketScan databases” by Mayur Sharma, MD, MCh, and colleagues (https://thejns.org/doi/full/10.3171/2018.1.SPINE171258).A cursory glance at headlines from news sources confirms the fact that the United States is in the midst of an opioid epidemic. And it can be deadly. In 2015, opioid overdose was cited as a cause of more than 33,000 deaths. A large proportion of opioid addiction can be traced back to the misuse of physician-prescribed medications initially provided for the management of acute or chronic pain.A common site of pain is in the lower back. Approximately 80% of adults experience low back pain at some time during their lives. In fact, low back pain has been cited as the single leading cause of disability.In this article, the authors set out to identify what effect on opioid dependence surgery may have when used to treat patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS), the forward slippage of a vertebra onto the vertebra beneath it. DS usually occurs in the lumbar spine and is due to a weakness in bones, joints, and ligaments that accompanies the aging process. Symptoms include pain in the lower back and legs, leg fatigue, muscle spasms, and irregular gait. Most of the time DS can be treated without surgery; however, surgery is indicated if there is progressive neurological damage or the patient’s pain is disabling and does not respond adequately to nonsurgical treatment.For their analysis, the authors defined indicators of opioid dependence as follows: continuedopioid use, more than 10 opioid prescriptions, or either a diagnosis of opioid dependence disorder or a prescription for treating opioid dependence disorder during the period of 1 year before or 3 to 15 months after surgery.Related StoriesTen-fold rise in tongue-tie surgery for newborns ‘without any real strong data’Implanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsGender biases are extremely common among health care professionalsThe authors extracted de-identified data from the MarketScan databases on 10,708 patients who had undergone surgery for DS. The median age of these patients was 61 years (interquartile range: 54 to 69 years). Sixty-five percent of the patients were women. In most cases (94%), the surgery was decompression with fusion, and in 76% of patients surgery involved multiple vertebrae. Many patients (54%) had one or more comorbidities. The majority of patients had commercial health insurance (61% as opposed to 35% with Medicare).The authors were particularly interested in evaluating opioid dependence after surgery for DS, but they did examine preoperative opioid dependence to identify new cases of dependency. The authors identified a dependency on opioid medications in 15% (1,591) of the patients with DS before surgery. Between 3 and 15 months after surgery, however, the percentage of patients with a dependency on opioids was 10% (1,060).After evaluating the impact of surgery, patient age and sex, comorbidities, and type of medical insurance held by the patients, the authors determined the following applied to patients who underwent surgery to treat DS: When asked to summarize the findings of the study. Dr. Sharma said, “Decompression and fusion for DS is associated with reduced risk of opioid dependency.” There was an association between surgical decompression with fusion and a decreased risk of postoperative opioid dependence. In this study, the opioid dependence was reduced by 5% after surgery for DS. Preoperative opioid dependence was associated with an increased risk of postoperative opioid dependence. Increased patient age was associated with a decreased risk of postoperative opioid dependence. Following surgery for DS, these patients were twice as likely to become opioid independent than they were to become opioid dependent.center_img Source:http://thejns.org/last_img read more