Agencies to seek accord on naming of H5N1 strains

first_imgDec 11, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – International health officials who met with Chinese health experts last week said the dispute over the “Fujian-like” strain of H5N1 avian influenza reflects confusion over names and vowed to seek an agreement on terminology for the various H5N1 subgroups.The meeting in Beijing came a few weeks after US and Hong Kong scientists reported in a medical journal that the Fujian-like strain had emerged as the predominant H5N1 strain in southern China in the past year and caused increased poultry outbreaks. Chinese authorities rejected the report, saying the strain did not exist as a distinct subgroup.A postmeeting statement from the World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), and World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) affirmed the existence of the Fujian-like strain, but said it has been called several different names.Participants agreed that “a number of significant H5N1 virus groups have been identified from poultry and wild birds in China since 2004,” the statement said. “One such identified group of viruses has been termed differently by several groups. Terms include the ‘waterfowl clade’, ‘clade 2.3’, and ‘Fujian-like’.”The statement also said, “It was agreed there is a need for a shared understanding and a common nomenclature for influenza A(H5N1) groups and that some of the recent confusion about the avian influenza situation in China resulted from multiple terms used to describe the same virus groups.”FAO/OIE/WHO will establish an international working group including Chinese experts to develop global consensus on terminology to be used when describing different influenza A(H5N1) virus groups.”According to a Reuters report, the WHO’s David Heymann told reporters after the meeting, “It’s very important that naming of viruses is done in a way that doesn’t stigmatize countries, that doesn’t stigmatize regions and doesn’t stigmatize individual people.” Heymann is the WHO’s assistant director-general for communicable diseases.Media reports on the meeting said Chinese experts didn’t deny the existence of the Fujian-like strain but did take exception to the name. According to a Canadian Press (CP) report, Chinese officials said the Hong Kong–US researchers had renamed a known H5N1 subgroup that some other authorities called Anhui-like, Anhui being another Chinese province.The FAO-OIE-WHO statement affirmed some aspects of the Hong Kong–US researchers’ report, which was published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. For example, the statement said information presented at the meeting indicated that the Fujian-like strain has grown more common in parts of southern China since 2005 and has been found in poultry in Laos and Malaysia this year.In addition, the statement said, “This virus group has been documented to cause some human infection in 2005 and 2006 in China,” as the Hong Kong–US researchers had said.But contrary to another possibility the researchers have suggested, “There is no evidence to date to link the emergence of this virus group with use of poultry influenza vaccination in China.”The statement affirmed that vaccination can control H5N1 in poultry, provided that vaccines are of high quality and well matched to circulating viruses and that vaccination coverage is adequate.”China has recently strengthened poultry surveillance to include serological (antibody) and virus surveillance as well as surveillance for disease outbreaks,” the statement added. With the increased surveillance, China is now publishing data monthly on the Ministry of Agriculture Web site, rather than annually, news services reported.China has been criticized for sharing too little data on the H5N1 virus and too few samples. Last month the country promised to provide samples to the WHO.Keiji Fukuda, coordinator of the WHO global influenza program, said all participants at the meeting agreed that sharing information and virus samples “is critical for the defense of everybody,” according to Reuters.The FAO-OIE-WHO statement said there has been no evidence that the Fujian-like strain is more transmissible to humans than other H5N1 viruses and no evidence that it has sparked human-to-human transmission.See also:Nov 10 CIDRAP News story “Chinese promise H5N1 samples, deny claim of new strain”Nov 3 CIDRAP News story “Study says new H5N1 strain pervades southern China”last_img read more

Chelsea keen to complete £47m deal for Real Madrid star

first_img The Spaniard could cost the Blues £47million, but that shouldn’t be a problem considering their recent transfer ban. Loading… Chelsea are set to make a move for Real Madrid playmaker Isco as Frank Lampard looks to create the best midfield in the Premier League.Advertisement Read Also: Chelsea alter transfer plan as Lampard prepares for Willian’s exit“I know we haven’t done anything yet so there is no proof in that but we are joined up.“I have very close conversations with Marina [Granovskaia, director], Petr Cech [technical and performance adviser] and Scott [McLachlan], who is the head of our recruitment department.“They know what I want and I will be fundamentally in the middle of who and what we bring into the club.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Chelsea are yet to make any signings since they saw their transfer ban reduced for this window, but Spanish media have claimed that Isco could break their spell away from the market.El Desmarque have reported that the Blues are very interested in bringing the 27-year-old to west London, adding that talks could already be underway.The report goes on to suggest that the club are keen to deploy Isco in front of N’Golo Kante, which would give the current Madrid star plenty of attacking freedom.Zinedine Zidane has handed Isco only six starts in La Liga so far this season, with the player failing to add any goals or assists.Lampard has been coy when asked about any possible incoming deals throughout January after being open about potential plans at the end of December.“We are certainly joined up on recruitment,” he said. Promoted ContentWill You Recognize Celebs In Their Kid Photos?10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime8 Weird Facts About Coffee That Will Surprise YouEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show YouWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Best & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The World8 Scenes That Prove TV Has Gone Too Far8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The Universelast_img read more