Giving a Push to Energy Transition at Offshore Energy 2019

first_imgIs the energy transition moving fast enough? Not yet. We can gain pace and we need to. Creating the opportunity to discuss collaboration, showcasing the necessary innovations, and learning from each other is what Offshore Energy set out to do this year.Combining oil, gas, marine energy, and offshore wind at one event, Offshore Energy Exhibition & Conference (OEEC) owned the theme: Home of Energy Transition.After three days of doing business, networking, celebrating innovation, and making new collaborations, Offshore Energy Exhibition & Conference has closed its doors for this year. The event brought together over 550 exhibitors and partners and over 10,000 visitors in the Amsterdam RAI.Trade missions visited from Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Lithuania, Mexico, Morocco, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Singapore, Vietnam, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. They shopped around and were introduced to various companies.The conference and side events attracted many (international) delegates.“During the conference I got to learn about the energy transition developments in the North Sea and in the world. I also listened to different scenarios and found out where opportunities lie for my company. It was very beneficial,” said a visitor of the conference.Energy Plaza was buzzingEnergy Plaza was a new feature to the Offshore Energy Concept and housed the Conference Dome, The Stage, Experience Zone, The Studio, Startup Zone and the exclusive Premium Lounge.“This edition of OEEC proved again the importance of bringing people from the industry together to collaborate. Especially when it comes to the energy transition we need to learn from each other,” says Coert van Zijll Langhout, director Navingo BV, organizer of OEEC.The next Offshore Energy Exhibition & Conference takes place on 26, 27 and 28 October 2020.last_img read more

Fernandes poses with Man Utd contract after sealing £68m move from Sporting

first_img The 25-year-old midfielder could be available to make his debut against Wolves at Old Trafford on Saturday before United take a 16-day winter break that includes a warm-weather training camp in Marbella. Loading… Bruno Fernandes has been pictured in Manchester United kit for the first time as he prepared to sign a four-and-a-half year contract to complete his £68m transfer. The Portugal international has been at United’s AON Training Complex on Thursday to undergo a medical and complete formalities. Bruno Fernandes has been pictured in Manchester United kit for the first time as he prepares to put pen to paper and complete his £68million move from Sporting Lisbon The picture, which sees Fernandes wearing a red United tracksuit top, was posted on the Instagram account of his agent Miguel Pinho. It’s been a whirlwind 24 hours for the midfielder who was in Portugal on Wednesday trying to finalise an exit from Sporting Lisbon. Fernandes jumped on a flight to Manchester as soon as United and Sporting Lisbon had put the final touches to the transfer that will cost the Premier League club an initial £46.6m plus up to £21.2m in add-ons. He spent Wednesday night at The Lowry Hotel after landing in England. It’s understood that the add-ons include a £4.2m payment to Sporting if United qualify for the Champions League, another £4.2m based on Fernandes’ appearances for the club and a separate £12.6m if individual targets are met. Read Also: Bruno Fernandes arrives Carrington for Man Utd medical The club officially confirmed on Wednesday that terms had been agreed with Sporting, who once sold Cristiano Ronaldo to United for £12.24m, and manager Ole Gunnar welcomed news that the protracted transfer was close to completion. ‘I’m delighted we’ve agreed,’ said Solskjaer. ‘There have been good negotiations with Sporting and we know, through history, these two clubs have been good with each other. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentThe 10 Best Secondary Education Systems In The World6 Incredibly Strange Facts About HurricanesBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemFantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread ArtA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic BombsWhat Are The Most Delicious Foods Out There?10 Actors Who Are Happy With The Type Of Roles They Got Hired ForThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market ValueEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show YouA Soviet Shot Put Thrower’s Record Hasn’t Been Beaten To This DayTop 10 TV Friends Who Used To Be Enemieslast_img read more

Duterte to visit Russia next month

first_imgThe President also extended his gratitude forRussia for its timely delivery of weapons and other equipment which helpeddefeat the Islamic State-linked militants in Marawi./PN “Ang sabiniya ay inimbitahan siya ni Russian President at tinanggap na niya. Ia-announce niya na lang kung ano ang mangyayari doon,”Panelo added. Presidential Spokesperson Salvador Panelo saidDuterte accepted Putin’s invitation to visit Moscow on the first week ofOctober. President Rodrigo Duterte first visited Russia on May 2017 but he was forced to return home due to the deadly clashes between government troops and Islamic State-linked militants in Marawi City. MALACAÑANG PHOTO MANILA – After his first state visit was cutshort two years ago, President Rodrigo Duterte is set to return to Russia earlynext month after President Vladimir Putin invited him.    center_img “When you visit a country other than yours, itmeans you are trying to improve the relations. It could mean further improvedrelations between the two countries,” he said. Duterte first visited Russia on May 2017 buthe was forced to return home due to the deadly clashes between governmenttroops and Islamic State-linked militants in Marawi City.  Duterte revitalized the country’s economic anddefense relations with Russia as he deplored the interference from otherwestern powers on local affairs.last_img read more

AG Curtis Hill successfully defends Indiana’s Right to Farm Act

first_imgThe Indiana Supreme Court has issued an order safeguarding the rights of Indiana farmers following the Office of the Attorney General’s defense of the state’s Right to Farm Act.“Defending Hoosier farmers is more important today than ever, and I am pleased the Indiana Supreme Court has upheld the constitutionality of the Indiana Right to Farm Act,” Attorney General Curtis Hill said. “Agriculture is a vital piece of Indiana’s economy, and laws such as this are effective in protecting it.”The Indiana Right to Farm Act strictly limits the scenarios in which an agricultural operation may be sued for nuisance. In 2015, two families in rural Hendricks County sued 4/9 Livestock LLC, its owners, and Co-Alliance LLP. 4/9 Livestock owns and operates an 8,000-hog concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO), which raises hogs owned by Co-Alliance.In the lawsuit, the families challenged the law, arguing the CAFO emits noxious odors that hinder their use and enjoyment of their properties. The families also argued that their properties, which are located less than one mile from the CAFO, have substantially diminished in value. The plaintiffs also challenged the statutes as unconstitutional.Attorney General Hill intervened in the lawsuit to defend the constitutionality of the Indiana Right to Farm Act and the Agricultural Canon, which says Indiana Code “shall be construed to protect the rights of farmers to choose among all generally accepted farming and livestock production practices, including the use of ever-changing technology.”The trial court granted summary judgment for the defendants on all of the plaintiffs’ claims. The Indiana Court of Appeals unanimously affirmed the trial court’s decision in April 2019, and the Indiana Supreme Court last week denied the plaintiffs’ petition to transfer the case.last_img read more

French Official: Electrical Short Circuit Likely Caused Notre Dame Fire

first_imgPolice investigators in Paris, France say they believe an electrical short-circuit was the likely cause of this week’s fire at the famed Notre Dame Cathedral.Investigators are still questioning cathedral staff and workers who were renovating the nearly 850-year-old Gothic-era structure, according to the Paris prosecutor’s office.Since the cathedral will be closed for at least several years, Bishop Patrick Chauvet, rector of the Catholic parish that worships at the Notre Dame, has suggested building a temporary structure on the plaza directly in front of the landmark. He says, “The rector has no cathedral for the moment. …. But I’m going to try to invent something.” The City Hall approved the proposal on Thursday, “subject to technical restraints.”French President Emmanuel Macron says he wants Notre Dame to be restored within five years, just ahead of the 2024 Summer Olympics, which Paris is hosting.The cathedral’s lead roof and spire were destroyed. However, its iconic bell towers, rose windows, organ, and artworks were preserved.last_img read more

Sweden nears Herd Immunitiy after “Open” Approach to COVID-19

first_imgSweden has remained more or less open throughout the coronavirus crisis preserving its economy. By doing next to nothing, Sweden is close to reaching “herd immunity.” Herd immunity occurs when a large percentage of a population gets infected, recovers, and subsequently becomes immune to further infection.Mr Tegnell, the head of Sweden’s Public Health Agency, declares that cases in the capital have plateaued, and that the effects of herd immunity were already apparent.“In a few weeks’ time we might reach herd immunity and we believe that is why we’re seeing a slow decline in cases, in spite of [testing for coronavirus] more and more,” according to Tegnell.And while it’s a bit early to tell, it could be paying off. Mr Tegnell has said that the capital Stockholm, the country’s outbreak epicentre, “might” reach herd immunity in May.In Swededn people are encouraged work at home, nursing homes are not accepting visitors, and universities have moved to online learning.But, people are not stuck at home. Bars, restaurants and gyms have been able to continue operating, provided they follow Sweden’s relatively less strict physical-distancing measures, and schools have also kept their doors open.“Locking people up at home won’t work in the longer term,” Sweden’s chief epidemiologist Anders Tegnell told reporters earlier this month.“Sooner or later people are going to go out anyway.”But officials are warning this doesn’t mean a potentially early end to the pandemic for Sweden, and the country’s approach is not without its critics at home and abroad.Sweden has had 16,755 confirmed cases of COVID-19, with 2,021 deaths: neighbouring Norway and Denmark, which have taken more stringent approaches, have just a fraction of those numbers.Sweden’s strategy to keep large parts of society open is widely backed by the public. It has been devised by scientists and backed by government, and yet not all the country’s virologists are convinced.Very little has shut down in Sweden, but data suggests the vast majority of the population have taken to voluntary social distancing, which is the crux of Sweden’s strategy to slow the spread of the virus.Usage of public transport has dropped significantly, large numbers are working from home, and most refrained from travelling over the Easter weekend. The government has also banned gatherings of more than 50 people and visits to elderly care homes.Around 9 in 10 Swedes say they keep at least a metre away from people at least some of the time, up from seven in 10 a month ago, according to a major survey by polling firm Novus.The Swedish Public Health Agency applauds the way people have responded to the virus without the government mandating anything.The scientists’ approach has led to weeks of global debate over whether Sweden has adopted a sensible and sustainable plan, or unwittingly plunged its population into an experiment that is causing unnecessary fatalities, and could fail to keep the spread of Covid-19 under control.By contrast, in the United States some local governments have adopted draconian policies opposite of Sweden.Residents in Riverside County, California, are now required to wear face coverings and could face a fine of $1,000 per violation per day if the mandate, which went into effect Sunday, is ignored.Recent data from the Riverside University Health System indicated 946 confirmed positive cases of coronavirus within the county with 25 deaths attributable to the illness.“While more and more Riverside County residents are getting COVID-19, not everybody’s getting the message,” said Riverside County public health officer Dr. Cameron Kaiser in a statement Saturday. “It started with staying home, social distance and covering your face. But now we change from saying that you should to saying that you must.”last_img read more

NASCAR annouces season will resume May 17 with seven races in 10 days, including four in elite Cup Series

first_imgNASCAR annouces season will resume May 17 with seven races in 10 days, including four in elite Cup Series April 30, 2020 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditCHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — NASCAR annouces season will resume May 17 with seven races in 10 days, including four in elite Cup Series.,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6center_img Associated Press last_img

Alumna seeks help from the Trojan family

first_imgAs a student at USC, Falicia Mandel was a consummate Trojan. She enjoyed the classes, the football and, more than anything, the camaraderie she shared with other students.Now, she’s hoping that camaraderie can help save her father’s life.Less than a year after her graduation last May, Mandel’s father, 60-year-old Joseph Mandel, was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood cells. The condition requires him to receive a stem cell transplant, but none of his family members is a match.In fact, matches are rare — only about one random person out of 20,000 will be a suitable donor. But Falicia is hoping one of the 35,000 students at USC could be the one.A lifelong L.A. resident who works for JPMorgan Chase & Co., Joe will celebrate his 30th wedding anniversary this year and has two children, 22-year-old Falicia and 26-year-old Mark Mandel.Since learning of the diagnosis, Falicia said she and her family have reached out to anyone they can find.“I contacted everybody I could think of because it’s really life or death,” she said. “You can’t have any humility. You can’t be shy. The bottom line is my father has one year to find a match and receive a transplant. It’s so scary that the chance of finding a match is so slim.”Joe’s relatives have been tested, but there is only a 25 percent chance a sibling’s stem cells will match. His older and younger sister match each other but not him, he said. His 91-year-old mother, a Holocaust survivor, cannot donate either.Younger people, such as college students, make better donors because they are less likely to have health complications or previous surgeries, and transfusions of their cells are more likely to be successful, Joe said.In the search for a match, Falicia said USC seemed like a natural place to turn.“I had built a strong relationship with many students on campus,” she said. “There’s always this whole stress at USC that we’re a family. You’re a Bruin for four years but a Trojan for life. I felt if there was any way to get a large turnout it was through USC.“Knowing the school and faculty and how students are … You see students fighting for each other every day, and that’s what I was looking for.”Like his daughter, Joe is a staunch Trojan fan who said he never misses a football game on TV.He said the response from USC has been tremendous.“It’s so nice to see the Trojan family step up to the plate because there are others that have not,” he said.Joe said he was impressed by the work his daughter has done to help find a match.“It’s not an easy thing,” he said. “She’s doing everything in her power to be there for me and help to save my life.”He also praised the school, both for welcoming his daughter and for supporting him.“When Falicia went there the first semester, I saw the family that was there and said, ‘I sure wish I’d been able to go to a school like USC,’” said Joe, who attended Cal State Northridge.Falicia arranged the drive through the City of Hope Cancer Center, where her father is being treated.“Tell them the time, date and the place, and they just show up ready to do testing,” she said.At USC, she has found support from organizations including USC Chabad, which will assist in organizing the drive.“It’s important to be there and help in any way we can. She’s a member of our community,” said Rabbi Dov Wagner, the director of the Chabad Jewish Center. “The highest possible ideal is the opportunity to save a life.”He said USC has held drives before but never for one individual.“In the past, it wasn’t for anyone specific, just getting people into the registry,” he said. “Having a specific emphasis makes it that much more urgent.”The drive will be held Wednesday and Thursday afternoons from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Trousdale Parkway.Both the test and the donation itself are relatively minor procedures. The DNA is tested with a cheek swab, while a stem cell transfusion, which is similar to donating blood, can be done on the donor’s schedule.“You get people who come up and go, ‘Nah, I don’t want to do it, I don’t want anyone cutting me open.’ But it’s not a surgery,” Joe said. “It’s painless for them. The effort for them is minimal, and they’re saving someone’s life. They may not be a match for me, but they could be a match for someone else.”All tested students will go into a registry and could potentially assist others. While students with Eastern-European Jewish ancestry are more likely to be a match for Joe, other ethnic minorities are also underrepresented in the registry, making it hard for those patients to find transfusions.“We have to do everything we can to find a match, if not for him, for someone else,” Wagner said. “It’s a great opportunity to help and show support that doesn’t cost anything.”Joe said he hopes several hundred students will come but would appreciate if any students came to be tested.“We’ve had other drives, and you get 40 to 50 people, but it’s 40 to 50 people we didn’t have before,” he said.Falicia said she was grateful for the support she had already received.“This is a very desperate situation for the entire family, and it’s easier to go through this situation knowing that very rarely do you have to beg someone to help you,” she said.She urged students to take the time to get tested, saying that she would do the same.“I would do it for them. I and my brother would do it for them. It’s really not a lot to do, and it’s something that is necessary,” she said. “We’re hoping there’s a match out there.”last_img read more

Baumann, Michalicka to defend Baylor Invite title

first_imgSenior Moritz Baumann and junior Marek Michalicka look to defend their doubles title and continue their impressive singles form from last season as the University of Wisconsin men’s tennis team heads down to Waco, Texas, for the annual Baylor Invitational this weekendThe tournament consists of over 110 players from 23 different schools, who will be separated into two 64-man draws as well as two 32-team doubles draws.The Badgers boast the No. 6 doubles team in the nation with Baumann and Michalicka, as well as their singles rankings of No. 19 and No. 37, respectively.The invitational will feature many other top-ranked players, including six in the top 50, and Oklahoma State’s Oleksandr Nedovyesov, the nation’s No. 1 ranked player.The level of talent at this tournament does not surprise UW head coach Greg Van Emburgh, but he believes his players — especially Baumann and Michalicka — deserve to be playing against the NCAA’s best.“They’re both great tennis players,” Van Emburgh said. “You know you hate to say this and put the pressure on them, but they’re probably the two best players in the country, singles and doubles.”“We’ve been playing [the Baylor Invitational] now for three or four years, and it just shows you the success of our program,” he added. “We’re able to send our good, top players down there, where they can compete at a high level in a tough, competitive situation. It really gives us an opportunity to really showcase our talent level.”Baumann, in particular, has had a lot of success at the Baylor Invitational throughout his career after finishing runner-up in the singles A draw two years ago and winning the doubles A draw last year.The competition will be tough as always, but he looks to continue his success in both draws.“Of course, I’m going to try to win it,” Baumann said. “I think I’m in good shape, but you never know. On a good day, you can win against anybody; on a bad day, you can lose against anybody, so we’ll see how it goes. Hopefully, I can win a couple of rounds there and get some confidence.”“A lot of different schools send their best players there,” he added. “There are always top 10, top 20 players in the nation. Every match is going to be tough.”Not only is he going to have to adjust to the competition but Baumann will also have to make adjustments to playing on hard courts after strictly playing on clay courts all summer in his home country of Germany.“It’s always a new experience when you come from clay courts in Germany, which are slower, and you come here and you have the hard courts again,” Baumann said. You’ve got to move differently, the ball bounces differently, it’s totally different. But I’ve practiced almost a month now here on the hard courts, and I have a good feeling.”That is not to say he doesn’t have any hesitations..“When you start a season, you’re always kind of nervous. You want to win the first match because it gives you confidence,” Baumann said.UW also is sending sophomore Patrick Pohlmann and senior Michael Dierberger, who will play in singles as well as pair up as another doubles team. Van Emburgh is excited about all of his players and hopes that this will be a growing experience for everyone and help them all get off to a good start to the fall season.“The four guys that we’re sending down there, they can do some great things. We’re still early in the season, so we want to look for a lot of good competition, get some matches, get some wins underneath our belt and try to have a good weekend of tennis.”Baumann echoed his coach’s confidence.“We won it last year, so we’re looking to defend it.”last_img read more

Kiké Hernandez’s homer breaks tie, lifts Dodgers to 6th consecutive win

first_imgPreviousMILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN – APRIL 19: Eric Thames #7 of the Milwaukee Brewers hits a home run in the eighth inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Miller Park on April 19, 2019 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)Dodgers second baseman Max Muncy watches his throw to first after forcing out the Brewers’ Yasmani Grandal on a ball hit by Travis Shaw, who was out to complete the double play during the sixth inning of Friday’s game in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN – APRIL 19: Ross Stripling #68 of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitches in the first inning against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park on April 19, 2019 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsMilwaukee Brewers’ Lorenzo Cain watches his single against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the first inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Milwaukee. It was the 1,000th hit of his career. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)Milwaukee Brewers’ Lorenzo Cain tips his helmet after he singled against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the first inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Milwaukee. It was the 1,000th hit of his career. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN – APRIL 19: Christian Yelich #22 of the Milwaukee Brewers hits a home run in the first inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Miller Park on April 19, 2019 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)Milwaukee Brewers’ Christian Yelich watches his two-run home run against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the first inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)Milwaukee Brewers’ Christian Yelich, right reacts with Lorenzo Cain after his two-run home run against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the first inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)Milwaukee Brewers’ Christian Yelich reacts with Lorenzo Cain (6) after his two-rim home run against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the first inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN – APRIL 19: Justin Turner #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits a single in the third inning against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park on April 19, 2019 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN – APRIL 19: Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers runs to third base in the second inning against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park on April 19, 2019 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)Milwaukee Brewers starting pitcher Jhoulys Chacin throws to the Los Angeles Dodgers during the first inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN – APRIL 19: Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits a sacrifice fly in the third inning against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park on April 19, 2019 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)Los Angeles starting pitcher Ross Stripling throws to the Milwaukee Brewers during the first inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN – APRIL 19: Max Muncy #13 of the Los Angeles Dodgers turns a double play past Yasmani Grandal #10 of the Milwaukee Brewers in the sixth inning at Miller Park on April 19, 2019 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN – APRIL 19: Manager Dave Roberts of the Los Angeles Dodgers relieves Scott Alexander #75 in the sixth inning against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park on April 19, 2019 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN – APRIL 19: Corey Seager #5 of the Los Angeles Dodgers hits a single in the fifth inning against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park on April 19, 2019 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Corey Seager can’t catch a foul ball hit by Milwaukee Brewers’ Mike Moustakas during the seventh inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Enrique Hernandez hits a three-run home run against the Milwaukee Brewers during the eighth inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Enrique Hernandez (14) celebrates with A.J. Pollock, who hit a three-run home run against the Milwaukee Brewers during the eighth inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)Milwaukee Brewers relief pitcher Josh Hader reacts after giving up a three-run home run to the Los Angeles Dodgers’ Enrique Hernandez during the eighth inning of a baseball game Friday, April 19, 2019, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)The Dodgers’ Kiké Hernandez (14) and Corey Seager (5) celebrate as they return to the dugout after Hernandez hit a go-ahead three-run home run in the eighth inning of Friday’s game against the Brewers in Milwaukee. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN – APRIL 19: Eric Thames #7 of the Milwaukee Brewers hits a home run in the eighth inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Miller Park on April 19, 2019 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)Dodgers second baseman Max Muncy watches his throw to first after forcing out the Brewers’ Yasmani Grandal on a ball hit by Travis Shaw, who was out to complete the double play during the sixth inning of Friday’s game in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)NextShow Caption1 of 22Dodgers second baseman Max Muncy watches his throw to first after forcing out the Brewers’ Yasmani Grandal on a ball hit by Travis Shaw, who was out to complete the double play during the sixth inning of Friday’s game in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)ExpandMILWAUKEE — It did not take an analytics department to figure out the odds weren’t in Kiké Hernandez’s favor.In 1,475 career plate appearances in the big leagues, Hernandez had hit 53 home runs. None of them came on an 0-and-2 count.In his big-league career, Josh Hader had never given up a home run on an 0-and-2 count (and only four hits of any kind).“Until now,” Hernandez said after Hader left a fastball up over the plate with two outs in the eighth inning of a tie game. Hernandez clubbed it into the home bullpen, lifting the Dodgers to a 5-3 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers on Friday night. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error The Dodgers have now won six consecutive games … after losing six in a row … after winning five in a row.Down 0-and-2 to Hader was an unlikely situation for Hernandez to play hero. He came into the game trailing a 4-for-27 slump behind him.“I feel like my ABs haven’t been that bad, especially last night. I just caught some bad launch angles,” Hernandez said sarcastically. “But it’s still April. It’s still early and the grind goes on.”The Dodgers’ starting pitchers have made the grind easier during this winning streak. But Friday’s starter Ross Stripling gave up a two-run home run to Christian Yelich and Dodgers manager Dave Roberts opted to pull him after he walked Yelich with two outs in the fifth inning.That made it the shortest start by a Dodgers pitcher since Caleb Ferguson went 2-2/3 innings in their “bullpen game” last Saturday. Still, Dodgers starters have a 1.40 ERA and 0.75 WHIP over the past six games.center_img The Dodgers erased the Yelich-aided headstart with single runs in the second and third and the score stayed tied through an assortment of pitching changes. In the top of the seventh, the Dodgers loaded the bases with one out but Justin Turner took a called third strike that might have been off the plate – one of a number of close calls by home plate umpire Brian O’Nora. And not the last one.That’s when Brewers manager Craig Counsell went to his bullpen ace.“Obviously with Hader having three days off you knew they were going to deploy him early and he was going to go multiples,” Roberts said. “You just don’t know when.”Hader came in to face Cody Bellinger with the bases loaded and struck him out with a perfect 2-and-2 fastball, dotted on the black low and away.But Hader’s control wandered in the eighth inning. He walked A.J. Pollock (a nine-pitch battle) and David Freese, alternating strikeouts to bring Hernandez up with two on and two out.He swung and missed at a first-pitch fastball.“I don’t know if it’s his extension, spin rate, whatever you want to call it, drop, angle, I don’t know. It gets there quick,” Hernandez said. “He does a really good job of hiding it. He’s got an unorthodox windup, kind of. He’s very aggressive with his hair flying everywhere.“It always seems his fastball is a tick higher than where you think it is. It was all about matching the plane and staying short to the ball.”The second pitch was another fastball in – off the plate in Hernandez’s eyes. But O’Nora called it strike two.“I thought, ‘Aw, (expletive) me,’ ” said Hernandez who stepped away from the plate to collect himself. “But it’s an AB and the game keeps going. Grind it out. Just keep the fight. Same approach – stay short, put the ball in play. They say if you put the ball in play, good things happen. Lately, they haven’t really happened for me. But that one felt good.”Hader’s fastball at the top of the strike zone came in at 95 mph and went out at 105.6 mph giving a lead that would hold up for the win. And Hernandez jokingly disputed the claim that it was his first homer on an 0-and-2 pitch.“No,” he said. “I remember when I was seven. I hit my first homer. It was 0-2. Whatever.”last_img read more